Cycling in Singapore


In the midst of Covid-19 where many companies are struggling and unemployment has risen quite a bit, companies focusing on bicycle sales are leveraging on interesting trends and circumstances forced upon by the Covid-19 restrictions.


Channel News Asia reported on 25th August 2020 that Singapore is seeing a cycling boom amid COVID-19, with increased ridership and bicycle sales.


With Singapore having a "car-lite" vision and bicycles seen as integral as part of the plan for the first and last mile transportation for commuters between MRT stations and bus stops, we can expect to see an even bigger increase in bicycle ownership and riders with time.


There seems to be an increasing number of accidents involving cyclists as well as spats between car drivers and cyclists in recent times. No data is available for number of accidents involving cyclists in 2020 but in 2019, there were 417 accidents involving cyclists and e-bike users. Although the number had dropped slightly from 2018, it still accounted for an average of 1.15 accidents per day over the year.


There has been reports on recent accidents involving cyclists that have been widely reported.



With the increasing presence of cyclists on the roads in Singapore, there seems to be an increasing number of Driver versus Cyclists altercations.


Let's understand the rights of cyclists as drivers and refresh our understanding of the laws regarding cycling on the roads. In an interesting article found on https://sportsincycling.com/ , 2 things were written in an article that defies the traditional understanding of drivers.





1. It is permissible to cycle abreast in a group on the left lane.

 

Under the Road Traffic Act (RTA), every bicycle shall be ridden close to the left-hand edge of the roadway and in such a manner so as to not obstruct vehicles moving at a faster speed. Also, whenever part of a road or a path adjacent to a road has been set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles, no bicycle shall be used on any other part of the roadway.


On-road cyclists can cycle at maximum two abreast on roads with at least two lanes in the same direction.


During bus lane operational hours, on-road cyclists cycling in bus lanes are to cycle in a single file only.  This is to reduce the incidence of cyclists slowing down buses on bus lanes.


2. Cyclists CAN’T cycle on expressways but CAN cycle on certain viaducts*


According to the Road Traffic Act (Cap. 276) Road Traffic (Expressways – Excluded Vehicles) Rules 2010, bicycles are prohibited on expressways.


BUT, did you know that all viaducts have a speed limit of 60-70 km/h and therefore, are not considered an expressway?

Where bicycles are prohibited:

  • Ayer Rajah Expressway.

  • Bukit Timah Expressway.

  • Central Expressway.

  • East Coast Parkway.

  • Kallang Paya Lebar Expressway.

  • Kranji Expressway.

  • Marina Coastal Expressway.

  • Pan Island Expressway.

  • Seletar Expressway.

  • Tampines Expressway.

  • Any slip road or interchange between any 2 or more of the expressways specified in items 1 to 10.

  • Any slip road leading into or out of any of the expressways specified in items 1 to 10.

Here’s the list of viaducts which you *can cycle on: 


Bartley Viaduct, Keppel Viaduct, Labrador Viaduct, Lornie Viaduct, MacRitchie Viaduct, Serangoon Viaduct, Tampines Viaduct, and Woodlands Checkpoint Viaduct. 

Note: Nicoll Highway is also a 70 km/h road and NOT an expressway.

*This rule only applies to viaducts so long as they are not linked to expressways. Cyclists are also not allowed to cycle on Tuas Viaduct.


There has of course been many updates to the law ever since and there is going to be a need to verify the authenticity and validity of the 2 above points.


Ultimately, what is more important than traffic laws is the responsible usage of roads by road users to ensure the safety of everyone.


If you are ever feeling unwell, have had some alcohol but have your car with you and need to still drive home, Bookvalet will be able to despatch a driver and reach you within 30mins to drive you home. This valet service is available everyday 24/7.


Advanced bookings are available on our website too at BookValet Online Booking. For emergency or last minute requests, whatsapp us directly on our mobile available on the website.


Stay safe and vigilant on the roads!





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